Location

Shearer Weber Dining Rooms 2 & 3

Start Date

19-4-2016 5:20 PM

Description

Despite the immense progress that has been made in Chaucerian studies, little research specifically studies how the Nun's Priest's Tale portrays elements of medieval elementary education and exploits the changes in social mobility occurring when the Tale was published. To provide a framework for discussing how pedagogical characteristics are represented in the text, this paper will examine individual characteristics of medieval elementary education. This discussion will elucidate the paper's thesis - how The Nun's Priest's Tale challenges the traditionally hierarchical structure of 14th-century English society. The genius of Chaucer's writing is rooted in the myriad interpretations his works offer his readers. To appreciate his genius, readers must heed the Nun's Priest's advice to "Taketh the fruyt, and lat the chaf be stille" (Chaucer 3443). This paper not only contributes a new interpretation of a beloved medieval work, but a new lens through which to view literature's role within 14th-century English society.

Comments

Supervised by Dr. Karen Mura

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Apr 19th, 5:20 PM

Chaucer Meets Burke: Examining Medieval Elementary Education and Societal Conventions Through a Rhetorical Lens

Shearer Weber Dining Rooms 2 & 3

Despite the immense progress that has been made in Chaucerian studies, little research specifically studies how the Nun's Priest's Tale portrays elements of medieval elementary education and exploits the changes in social mobility occurring when the Tale was published. To provide a framework for discussing how pedagogical characteristics are represented in the text, this paper will examine individual characteristics of medieval elementary education. This discussion will elucidate the paper's thesis - how The Nun's Priest's Tale challenges the traditionally hierarchical structure of 14th-century English society. The genius of Chaucer's writing is rooted in the myriad interpretations his works offer his readers. To appreciate his genius, readers must heed the Nun's Priest's advice to "Taketh the fruyt, and lat the chaf be stille" (Chaucer 3443). This paper not only contributes a new interpretation of a beloved medieval work, but a new lens through which to view literature's role within 14th-century English society.

 

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