Event Title

The Influence of Corporatization on Pennsylvania Higher Education from 2003 to 2015

Presenter Information

Emonie Black, Susquehanna University

Start Date

25-4-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2017 2:20 PM

Description

Corporatization is defined as the application of neoliberal market principles in institutions of higher learning. In this study, I attempt to identify the various ways in which corporatization influences the functioning of Elizabethtown College, Juniata College, Ursinus College, Susquehanna University, Franklin and Marshall College, Duquesne University, Lehigh University, and Bucknell University from 2003 to 2015. The major variables investigated as indicators of corporatization include: the increase in administrative staff, the number of full time professors and part time professors, the state of academic culture, and the allocation of institutional expenses. This study analyzes the theoretical perspective of George Ritzer, known as Mcdonaldization, in order to describe the relationship between his theory and the process of corporatization within social institutions. This is followed, by a detailed discussion of my findings, paired with a conclusive explanation of the ways in which corporatization produces observable changes within the major variables investigated.

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Apr 25th, 2:00 PM Apr 25th, 2:20 PM

The Influence of Corporatization on Pennsylvania Higher Education from 2003 to 2015

Corporatization is defined as the application of neoliberal market principles in institutions of higher learning. In this study, I attempt to identify the various ways in which corporatization influences the functioning of Elizabethtown College, Juniata College, Ursinus College, Susquehanna University, Franklin and Marshall College, Duquesne University, Lehigh University, and Bucknell University from 2003 to 2015. The major variables investigated as indicators of corporatization include: the increase in administrative staff, the number of full time professors and part time professors, the state of academic culture, and the allocation of institutional expenses. This study analyzes the theoretical perspective of George Ritzer, known as Mcdonaldization, in order to describe the relationship between his theory and the process of corporatization within social institutions. This is followed, by a detailed discussion of my findings, paired with a conclusive explanation of the ways in which corporatization produces observable changes within the major variables investigated.