Event Title

Unmasking the History of Performance

Start Date

25-4-2017 5:30 PM

End Date

25-4-2017 5:50 PM

Description

A collection of researched Western theatre performance styles, developed into a 30-minute performance, that provides the audience with a picture of how theatre has evolved across the centuries: Greek tragedy as exemplified by Euripides' "Trojan Women," English Renaissance as exemplified by William Shakespeare's "As You Like It," late Victorian comedy of manners as exemplified by Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest," and concluding with two Anton Chekhov monologues that exemplify a turning point in Western performance style toward psychological Realism. The actors bring audience members on an educational journey through theatre, utilizing background research in the historical cultures and events as well as historical staging and acting techniques. This performance is intended to showcase the Susquehanna theatre department's work and reveal a piece of what a theatre student studies in order to create art beyond typical commercial theatre.

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Apr 25th, 5:30 PM Apr 25th, 5:50 PM

Unmasking the History of Performance

A collection of researched Western theatre performance styles, developed into a 30-minute performance, that provides the audience with a picture of how theatre has evolved across the centuries: Greek tragedy as exemplified by Euripides' "Trojan Women," English Renaissance as exemplified by William Shakespeare's "As You Like It," late Victorian comedy of manners as exemplified by Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest," and concluding with two Anton Chekhov monologues that exemplify a turning point in Western performance style toward psychological Realism. The actors bring audience members on an educational journey through theatre, utilizing background research in the historical cultures and events as well as historical staging and acting techniques. This performance is intended to showcase the Susquehanna theatre department's work and reveal a piece of what a theatre student studies in order to create art beyond typical commercial theatre.