Event Title

Spider and Beetle Communities Across a Japanese Knotweed Dominated Riparian Buffer System

Start Date

25-4-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2017 4:20 PM

Description

Invasive species are known to affect diversity within riparian buffer systems. We collected wolf spiders and ground beetles using pitfall traps throughout two sites along a riparian buffer system during the fall of 2016. Additionally, Tigrosa helluo and Pterostitchus melanarius, the two most common species collected, were placed in containers with varying options; such as light levels, substrate types, or moisture levels reflecting those found in the field. Preliminary results suggest that diversity is highest at the transitional zones between the Knotweed community and the field and near-river environments located on either side because both spiders and beetles exist. They also suggest that, while light and moisture levels had little effect on habitat preference, both species preferred thatch over bare soil.The spiders and beetles collected in the fall were used for an in lab competitive experiment using odor ques of both species. The preliminary results suggest that the spiders and beetles prefer the side without the ques of the opposite species. Suggesting that there may be the presence of airborne enemy-avoidance.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 25th, 4:00 PM Apr 25th, 4:20 PM

Spider and Beetle Communities Across a Japanese Knotweed Dominated Riparian Buffer System

Invasive species are known to affect diversity within riparian buffer systems. We collected wolf spiders and ground beetles using pitfall traps throughout two sites along a riparian buffer system during the fall of 2016. Additionally, Tigrosa helluo and Pterostitchus melanarius, the two most common species collected, were placed in containers with varying options; such as light levels, substrate types, or moisture levels reflecting those found in the field. Preliminary results suggest that diversity is highest at the transitional zones between the Knotweed community and the field and near-river environments located on either side because both spiders and beetles exist. They also suggest that, while light and moisture levels had little effect on habitat preference, both species preferred thatch over bare soil.The spiders and beetles collected in the fall were used for an in lab competitive experiment using odor ques of both species. The preliminary results suggest that the spiders and beetles prefer the side without the ques of the opposite species. Suggesting that there may be the presence of airborne enemy-avoidance.