Event Title

Examination of microglial morphology in a Mouse Model of Acute Ethanol Intoxication

Presenter Information

Lauren Cram, Susquehanna University

Faculty Advisor

Sarah Cassella

Start Date

25-4-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2017 1:00 PM

Description

Stressful stimuli have been shown to elicit a greater amount of alcohol consumption in females than males. Induced stress has been shown to increase the neuroinflammatory response and increase stress behaviors in both sexes while ethanol intoxication decreases stress behaviors in females but has no effect on stress behaviors in males. However, the effects of ethanol intoxication on neuroinflammation are controversial, and the difference between males and females has been insufficiently studied. To better understand the behavioral differences between males and females with ethanol intoxication, the neuroinflammatory response between sexes was analyzed through microglial activation. Microglia are the immune cells of the central nervous system and respond to stress by activating and undergoing distinct morphological changes. In the current study, male and female Swiss Webster mice were treated with an acute ethanol injection (4 g/kg of 20% ethanol) and compared to saline-injected and Naive mice. Brains were sectioned at 30 microns and prepared for immunohistochemical analysis through staining of the microglial protein, Iba-1. Microglial morphology in stress-regulating regions of the brain—the hippocampus and prefrontal cortices—were analyzed using confocal microscopy and used to evaluate the neuroinflammatory response. Current evidence suggests ethanol reduced the inflammatory response in females but not males as evidenced by a decrease in microglial activation.

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Apr 25th, 12:00 PM Apr 25th, 1:00 PM

Examination of microglial morphology in a Mouse Model of Acute Ethanol Intoxication

Stressful stimuli have been shown to elicit a greater amount of alcohol consumption in females than males. Induced stress has been shown to increase the neuroinflammatory response and increase stress behaviors in both sexes while ethanol intoxication decreases stress behaviors in females but has no effect on stress behaviors in males. However, the effects of ethanol intoxication on neuroinflammation are controversial, and the difference between males and females has been insufficiently studied. To better understand the behavioral differences between males and females with ethanol intoxication, the neuroinflammatory response between sexes was analyzed through microglial activation. Microglia are the immune cells of the central nervous system and respond to stress by activating and undergoing distinct morphological changes. In the current study, male and female Swiss Webster mice were treated with an acute ethanol injection (4 g/kg of 20% ethanol) and compared to saline-injected and Naive mice. Brains were sectioned at 30 microns and prepared for immunohistochemical analysis through staining of the microglial protein, Iba-1. Microglial morphology in stress-regulating regions of the brain—the hippocampus and prefrontal cortices—were analyzed using confocal microscopy and used to evaluate the neuroinflammatory response. Current evidence suggests ethanol reduced the inflammatory response in females but not males as evidenced by a decrease in microglial activation.