Event Title

Biological Effectiveness of Instream Restoration

Faculty Advisor

Jonathan Niles

Start Date

25-4-2017 5:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2017 6:00 PM

Description

Agriculture impacts stream ecosystems through a variety of means including increases in sedimentation, increased runoff of pesticides and nutrients all of which can create changes in stream habitats, as well as shifts in fish and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages. In recent years, however, many farmers have become open to changing farming practices. In order to test the biotic response of the restoration process, we conducted pre-restoration sampling in 2015, and post restoration sampling in 2016. Stream assessments consisted of benthic macroinvertebrate sampling according to PADEP protocol, backpack electrofishing of a 100m site, and collection of standard water chemistry data. After the restoration process was complete sampling efforts have yielded positive increases in overall fish populations at sample sites. With an increase in riparian buffers and increased retention of stream bank sediment, the streams are seeing a positive increase in stream biota due to likely decreases in sedimentation, and increases in habitat.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 25th, 5:00 PM Apr 25th, 6:00 PM

Biological Effectiveness of Instream Restoration

Agriculture impacts stream ecosystems through a variety of means including increases in sedimentation, increased runoff of pesticides and nutrients all of which can create changes in stream habitats, as well as shifts in fish and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages. In recent years, however, many farmers have become open to changing farming practices. In order to test the biotic response of the restoration process, we conducted pre-restoration sampling in 2015, and post restoration sampling in 2016. Stream assessments consisted of benthic macroinvertebrate sampling according to PADEP protocol, backpack electrofishing of a 100m site, and collection of standard water chemistry data. After the restoration process was complete sampling efforts have yielded positive increases in overall fish populations at sample sites. With an increase in riparian buffers and increased retention of stream bank sediment, the streams are seeing a positive increase in stream biota due to likely decreases in sedimentation, and increases in habitat.