Event Title

Thalidomide Treated Sperm and the Effects on Embryonic Development of Lytechinus pictus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

Start Date

25-4-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2017 5:00 PM

Description

Thalidomide causes birth defects especially when taken during early pregnancy. Upon ingestion by males, thalidomide can be detected in semen. However, little research exists studying the reproductive effects of male exposure to thalidomide. Using sea urchins as a model organism, thalidomide treated sea urchin sperm and controls were used to fertilize untreated eggs. Observations of embryos at 24, 48 and 72-hour time points correlated with key developmental stages. Preliminary data indicates that embryos from eggs fertilized by treated sperm display up to 30% more abnormal characteristics than control embryos at the 24 and 48-hour time points. We suspect thalidomide could be causing an epigenetic effect. Current experiments examining changes in DNA patterns of treated and untreated sperm, immunohistochemistry targeting primary mesenchyme cells, and in situ hybridization to explore mRNA levels are ongoing.

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Apr 25th, 4:00 PM Apr 25th, 5:00 PM

Thalidomide Treated Sperm and the Effects on Embryonic Development of Lytechinus pictus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

Thalidomide causes birth defects especially when taken during early pregnancy. Upon ingestion by males, thalidomide can be detected in semen. However, little research exists studying the reproductive effects of male exposure to thalidomide. Using sea urchins as a model organism, thalidomide treated sea urchin sperm and controls were used to fertilize untreated eggs. Observations of embryos at 24, 48 and 72-hour time points correlated with key developmental stages. Preliminary data indicates that embryos from eggs fertilized by treated sperm display up to 30% more abnormal characteristics than control embryos at the 24 and 48-hour time points. We suspect thalidomide could be causing an epigenetic effect. Current experiments examining changes in DNA patterns of treated and untreated sperm, immunohistochemistry targeting primary mesenchyme cells, and in situ hybridization to explore mRNA levels are ongoing.