Event Title

Climate change impacts on food sources of terrestrial salamanders in the northeastern United States

Faculty Advisor

Tanya Matlaga

Start Date

25-4-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2017 1:00 PM

Description

Climate change is becoming an increasingly prevalent topic as it affects populations globally. Invertebrates are a primary food source of terrestrial salamanders and their decline would initiate a trophic cascade, thereby leading to a decline in the abundance of salamanders. A study using cover board arrays to examine Plethodon cinereus demography has been in operation since 2013. In three of the nine sites, we applied a snow removal treatment to imitate potential impacts from climate change anticipated in northeast U.S. We collected leaf litter samples and processed samples in a Berlese funnel apparatus to collect invertebrates. We identified invertebrates to class level and used gastric lavage to determine which invertebrates are the primary food source of P. cinereus. We did not find a statistically significant difference between snow removal and control sites. Fall 2016 samples are currently being examined and data from Massachusetts will be examined for latitudinal comparison.

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Apr 25th, 12:00 PM Apr 25th, 1:00 PM

Climate change impacts on food sources of terrestrial salamanders in the northeastern United States

Climate change is becoming an increasingly prevalent topic as it affects populations globally. Invertebrates are a primary food source of terrestrial salamanders and their decline would initiate a trophic cascade, thereby leading to a decline in the abundance of salamanders. A study using cover board arrays to examine Plethodon cinereus demography has been in operation since 2013. In three of the nine sites, we applied a snow removal treatment to imitate potential impacts from climate change anticipated in northeast U.S. We collected leaf litter samples and processed samples in a Berlese funnel apparatus to collect invertebrates. We identified invertebrates to class level and used gastric lavage to determine which invertebrates are the primary food source of P. cinereus. We did not find a statistically significant difference between snow removal and control sites. Fall 2016 samples are currently being examined and data from Massachusetts will be examined for latitudinal comparison.