Event Title

Examining how landscape permeability affects the movement of a terrestrial salamander

Faculty Advisor

Tanya Matlaga

Start Date

25-4-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2017 1:00 PM

Description

Landscape features inhibit movement of species with poor dispersal capabilities and high sensitivity to habitat alteration. Terrestrial salamanders are thought of as incapable of long distance movement, but records indicate that individuals will travel up to 90 meters to return to their territories. Different sexes and size classes of salamanders may vary in their motivation to move across a landscape. Our study examines whether forest roads and streams are obstacles in the movement of red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus). We began an experimental study at Camp Karoondinha in Millmont, PA in June 2015 to quantify recapture rates of P. cinereus after displacement across roads and streams. A displacement method allows us to understand the movement capabilities of salamanders and how distance and barriers affect these capabilities. Our data suggest that P. cinereus are capable of moving across barriers. Return rates are reduced with greater distance and when an obstacle is present.

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Apr 25th, 12:00 PM Apr 25th, 1:00 PM

Examining how landscape permeability affects the movement of a terrestrial salamander

Landscape features inhibit movement of species with poor dispersal capabilities and high sensitivity to habitat alteration. Terrestrial salamanders are thought of as incapable of long distance movement, but records indicate that individuals will travel up to 90 meters to return to their territories. Different sexes and size classes of salamanders may vary in their motivation to move across a landscape. Our study examines whether forest roads and streams are obstacles in the movement of red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus). We began an experimental study at Camp Karoondinha in Millmont, PA in June 2015 to quantify recapture rates of P. cinereus after displacement across roads and streams. A displacement method allows us to understand the movement capabilities of salamanders and how distance and barriers affect these capabilities. Our data suggest that P. cinereus are capable of moving across barriers. Return rates are reduced with greater distance and when an obstacle is present.