Event Title

The Effect of an Experimental Slurry Wall on Groundwater Flow by Means of Seismic Refraction and Electrical Resistivity Methods

Presenter Information

Michael Sharer

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Ahmed Lachhab

Start Date

24-4-2018 4:40 PM

End Date

24-4-2018 5:40 PM

Description

The construction of a slurry wall at Montandon Marsh, PA provided an opportunity to use Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Seismic Refraction Tomography methods to determine the impact on local hydrology. The hydrogeophysical study was over a 13-month period where ERT and SRT surveys, ground-truthed by soil drilling logs, were conducted. The field site is comprised of alluvial sediment on the Keyser and Tonoloway formation, which is suitable for the development of zones of high saturation and preferential flow. The ERT has visualized these zones and the SRT identified the depth to bedrock and subsurface stratigraphy. ERT identified the preferential flow areas due to the decrease of resistivity caused by the presence of water. The slurry wall was seen to impact the groundwater flow at the south end of the wall. Due to the small size of the slurry wall, there will be no major impact when considered at large scale.

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Apr 24th, 4:40 PM Apr 24th, 5:40 PM

The Effect of an Experimental Slurry Wall on Groundwater Flow by Means of Seismic Refraction and Electrical Resistivity Methods

The construction of a slurry wall at Montandon Marsh, PA provided an opportunity to use Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Seismic Refraction Tomography methods to determine the impact on local hydrology. The hydrogeophysical study was over a 13-month period where ERT and SRT surveys, ground-truthed by soil drilling logs, were conducted. The field site is comprised of alluvial sediment on the Keyser and Tonoloway formation, which is suitable for the development of zones of high saturation and preferential flow. The ERT has visualized these zones and the SRT identified the depth to bedrock and subsurface stratigraphy. ERT identified the preferential flow areas due to the decrease of resistivity caused by the presence of water. The slurry wall was seen to impact the groundwater flow at the south end of the wall. Due to the small size of the slurry wall, there will be no major impact when considered at large scale.