Event Title

Effects of gestational food deprivation on Tyrosine Hydroxylase in the reward pathway

Presenter Information

Kaitlyn Brough

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Erin Rhinehart

Start Date

24-4-2018 4:20 PM

End Date

24-4-2018 5:20 PM

Description

Low birth weight offspring have an increased risk of obesity and metabolic disorders. More recently a link between LBW and addiction has been suggested, providing the possibility that reward pathway development is altered in LBW offspring. Tyrosine hydroxylase is the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine synthesis, the primary neurotransmitter in the reward pathway. Therefore, we investigated whether or not gestational food deprivation alters offspring tyrosine hydroxylase expression, possibly leading to alterations in susceptibility to addiction. In restricted off spring we found a significant difference in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). This research will be able to contribute to better understanding how the reward pathway contributes to addiction and therefore the risk of obesity.

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Apr 24th, 4:20 PM Apr 24th, 5:20 PM

Effects of gestational food deprivation on Tyrosine Hydroxylase in the reward pathway

Low birth weight offspring have an increased risk of obesity and metabolic disorders. More recently a link between LBW and addiction has been suggested, providing the possibility that reward pathway development is altered in LBW offspring. Tyrosine hydroxylase is the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine synthesis, the primary neurotransmitter in the reward pathway. Therefore, we investigated whether or not gestational food deprivation alters offspring tyrosine hydroxylase expression, possibly leading to alterations in susceptibility to addiction. In restricted off spring we found a significant difference in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). This research will be able to contribute to better understanding how the reward pathway contributes to addiction and therefore the risk of obesity.