Event Title

Predatory State: An Analysis of Petty Corruption Participation in West Africa

Presenter Information

Benjamin James Foster

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Kirk Harris

Start Date

24-4-2018 1:40 PM

End Date

24-4-2018 2:40 PM

Description

One of the most elusive economic and social problems West Africa faces today is that of petty corruption. Placing a burden on the poor and allowing those with funds to escape the rule of law, the payment of small bribes and gifts to acquire basic services has become a defining characteristic of modern African states. Though the social effects of petty corruption are well-documented, few studies have attempted to identify the reasons ordinary people participate in this illegal behavior. In this study, I have examined individual-level survey data from across West Africa, and found significant evidence that interactions with the state and officials, poverty, and access to basic services and public facilities lead to massive increases in various forms of petty corruption. These findings provide insight into the reasons why petty corruption has become endemic in West Africa, and why governments have been so ineffective at finding a solution.

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Apr 24th, 1:40 PM Apr 24th, 2:40 PM

Predatory State: An Analysis of Petty Corruption Participation in West Africa

One of the most elusive economic and social problems West Africa faces today is that of petty corruption. Placing a burden on the poor and allowing those with funds to escape the rule of law, the payment of small bribes and gifts to acquire basic services has become a defining characteristic of modern African states. Though the social effects of petty corruption are well-documented, few studies have attempted to identify the reasons ordinary people participate in this illegal behavior. In this study, I have examined individual-level survey data from across West Africa, and found significant evidence that interactions with the state and officials, poverty, and access to basic services and public facilities lead to massive increases in various forms of petty corruption. These findings provide insight into the reasons why petty corruption has become endemic in West Africa, and why governments have been so ineffective at finding a solution.