Event Title

Comparison of Thalidomide Treated Sperm and Treated Artificial Sea Water on L. pictus and S. purpuratus Embryonic Development

Presenter Information

Kimberly Chopin
Chelsea Moran

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Jan Reichard-Brown

Start Date

24-4-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2018 5:00 PM

Description

When ingested during pregnancy, thalidomide causes birth defects. Extensive research examined the effects of the drug on developing embryos, but little work has been done on detecting how thalidomide affects male reproduction The purpose of this study is to identify whether thalidomide treated sperm results in a higher percentage of developmental abnormalities in sea urchin embryos in comparison to embryos in water treated thalidomide. Thalidomide treated sea urchin sperm and sperm without treatment were used to fertilize untreated eggs and allowed to develop in normal artificial sea water. Embryos fertilized with untreated sperm were cultured in artificial sea water containing thalidomide as well. All embryos were observed at 24, 48, 72 hours and the types and numbers of abnormalities were quantified. Preliminary data shows that embryos fertilized with treated sperm had a higher percentage of abnormal characteristics than controls. Embryos developing in thalidomide containing sea water also exhibited abnormalities. Future experiments will help determine the effect thalidomide has on male reproduction.

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Apr 24th, 4:00 PM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

Comparison of Thalidomide Treated Sperm and Treated Artificial Sea Water on L. pictus and S. purpuratus Embryonic Development

When ingested during pregnancy, thalidomide causes birth defects. Extensive research examined the effects of the drug on developing embryos, but little work has been done on detecting how thalidomide affects male reproduction The purpose of this study is to identify whether thalidomide treated sperm results in a higher percentage of developmental abnormalities in sea urchin embryos in comparison to embryos in water treated thalidomide. Thalidomide treated sea urchin sperm and sperm without treatment were used to fertilize untreated eggs and allowed to develop in normal artificial sea water. Embryos fertilized with untreated sperm were cultured in artificial sea water containing thalidomide as well. All embryos were observed at 24, 48, 72 hours and the types and numbers of abnormalities were quantified. Preliminary data shows that embryos fertilized with treated sperm had a higher percentage of abnormal characteristics than controls. Embryos developing in thalidomide containing sea water also exhibited abnormalities. Future experiments will help determine the effect thalidomide has on male reproduction.