Event Title

Conservation Status and Taxonomy of the Eastern Coyote (Canis latrans) of Eastern North America

Presenter Information

Olivia Cohenour

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Carlos Iudica

Start Date

24-4-2018 5:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2018 6:00 PM

Description

The taxonomic status of coyotes (Canis latrans) and related wolf species, gray (Canis lupus), red (Canis rufus), and Eastern Canadian wolves (Canis lycaon), is under debate as to the proper classification of these species and the consequential conservation measurements. Coyotes found in Eastern North America (ENA) are hybrids of western coyotes and wolves, therefore, the line between wolves and coyote species in ENA have blurred. Researchers are unsure if the species found in ENA are to be considered a separate species, subspecies, or hybrids. A criterion to define these taxa is desperately needed, and until used and recognized by most authors, there will not be a clear understanding of the phylogenetic relationships between these taxa. We hope that a thorough compilation on the taxonomic status of coyotes and wolves will aspire to show the varying arguments on classification and phylogeny which will go together with proper conservation and management measures.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 24th, 5:00 PM Apr 24th, 6:00 PM

Conservation Status and Taxonomy of the Eastern Coyote (Canis latrans) of Eastern North America

The taxonomic status of coyotes (Canis latrans) and related wolf species, gray (Canis lupus), red (Canis rufus), and Eastern Canadian wolves (Canis lycaon), is under debate as to the proper classification of these species and the consequential conservation measurements. Coyotes found in Eastern North America (ENA) are hybrids of western coyotes and wolves, therefore, the line between wolves and coyote species in ENA have blurred. Researchers are unsure if the species found in ENA are to be considered a separate species, subspecies, or hybrids. A criterion to define these taxa is desperately needed, and until used and recognized by most authors, there will not be a clear understanding of the phylogenetic relationships between these taxa. We hope that a thorough compilation on the taxonomic status of coyotes and wolves will aspire to show the varying arguments on classification and phylogeny which will go together with proper conservation and management measures.