Event Title

Identifying a Potentially Novel Microbiospora Species from Centralia, PA Through Physiological and Genetic Comparisons of Closely Related Species

Presenter Information

Desiree Furbert

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Tammy Tobin

Start Date

24-4-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2018 5:00 PM

Description

Centralia, Pennsylvania is the location of an underground mine fire that has continued to burn since 1962. Due to the fire, gases such as carbon monoxide seeped into homes and that, combined with the fear of sinkholes, forced all but a few residents to evacuate the area. As the fire burns, it also elevates soil temperatures and alters the environment in which bacteria grow, selecting for rare thermophilic species. A potentially novel species of thermophilic Microbispora has been shown to produce antimicrobial agents that inhibit Staphylococcus aureus growth. This research focuses on determining if this species is in fact novel, and on identifying the antimicrobials that it produces. To do this, the isolate (CENT-2) is being compared genetically and physiologically to its three most closely related species, according to 16S rRNA gene sequencing; M. rosea, M. mesophila and M. corallina. Thus far, the physical characteristics of each of the species, such as fatty acid composition, physical appearance and growth temperature ranges have been compared, and support the hypothesis that CENT-2 is a novel species. Genomic DNA has also been isolated from CENT-2 and its closely related species; they will then undergo full genome sequencing. Comparisons between these genomes and the published genome sequences for M. corallina, M. rosea and M. mesophila will help determine if CENT-2 is, in fact, novel. The analysis will focus specifically on genes like DNA polymerase, DNA gyrase, the 16S rRNA genes-that are commonly used in species identification, and on genes such as PKSII and NRPS that are known to be involved in antibiotic production. In understanding the identity of this species, and its potential for antibiotic production, we hope to identify new forms of antibiotics for medicinal use.

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Apr 24th, 4:00 PM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

Identifying a Potentially Novel Microbiospora Species from Centralia, PA Through Physiological and Genetic Comparisons of Closely Related Species

Centralia, Pennsylvania is the location of an underground mine fire that has continued to burn since 1962. Due to the fire, gases such as carbon monoxide seeped into homes and that, combined with the fear of sinkholes, forced all but a few residents to evacuate the area. As the fire burns, it also elevates soil temperatures and alters the environment in which bacteria grow, selecting for rare thermophilic species. A potentially novel species of thermophilic Microbispora has been shown to produce antimicrobial agents that inhibit Staphylococcus aureus growth. This research focuses on determining if this species is in fact novel, and on identifying the antimicrobials that it produces. To do this, the isolate (CENT-2) is being compared genetically and physiologically to its three most closely related species, according to 16S rRNA gene sequencing; M. rosea, M. mesophila and M. corallina. Thus far, the physical characteristics of each of the species, such as fatty acid composition, physical appearance and growth temperature ranges have been compared, and support the hypothesis that CENT-2 is a novel species. Genomic DNA has also been isolated from CENT-2 and its closely related species; they will then undergo full genome sequencing. Comparisons between these genomes and the published genome sequences for M. corallina, M. rosea and M. mesophila will help determine if CENT-2 is, in fact, novel. The analysis will focus specifically on genes like DNA polymerase, DNA gyrase, the 16S rRNA genes-that are commonly used in species identification, and on genes such as PKSII and NRPS that are known to be involved in antibiotic production. In understanding the identity of this species, and its potential for antibiotic production, we hope to identify new forms of antibiotics for medicinal use.