Event Title

Determining the movement efficiency of terrestrial salamanders across aquatic barriers

Presenter Information

Jacqueline Meredith

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Tanya Matlaga

Start Date

24-4-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2018 5:00 PM

Description

Little is known about the swimming ability of terrestrial salamanders. Studies of movement have shown that some species are capable of crossing streams during long distance travel. However, the efficiency of movement across aquatic barriers is largely unknown. Our study attempts to document the success of terrestrial salamanders to swim or otherwise cross streams. We compared the swimming ability of terrestrial salamanders to that of semi-aquatic salamanders. We collected individual semi-aquatic and terrestrial salamanders from under natural cover objects and placed the individual in an aquatic arena. Through video analysis, we selected a 3-5 second length of burst speed and calculated the velocity of the salamander in that segment. We expected semi-aquatic salamanders to demonstrate a higher swimming velocity. Our calculations show that semi-aquatic individuals have a significantly higher swimming velocity than terrestrial individuals (p = 0.0002).

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Apr 24th, 4:00 PM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

Determining the movement efficiency of terrestrial salamanders across aquatic barriers

Little is known about the swimming ability of terrestrial salamanders. Studies of movement have shown that some species are capable of crossing streams during long distance travel. However, the efficiency of movement across aquatic barriers is largely unknown. Our study attempts to document the success of terrestrial salamanders to swim or otherwise cross streams. We compared the swimming ability of terrestrial salamanders to that of semi-aquatic salamanders. We collected individual semi-aquatic and terrestrial salamanders from under natural cover objects and placed the individual in an aquatic arena. Through video analysis, we selected a 3-5 second length of burst speed and calculated the velocity of the salamander in that segment. We expected semi-aquatic salamanders to demonstrate a higher swimming velocity. Our calculations show that semi-aquatic individuals have a significantly higher swimming velocity than terrestrial individuals (p = 0.0002).