Event Title

Presence of Benevolent Racism in College Students and Effects of Extracurricular Involvement

Presenter Information

Basil Mokhallalati

Faculty Advisor

Dr. M.L. Koltz

Start Date

24-4-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2018 1:00 PM

Description

Unlike traditional-racism, where the stereotypes are entirely negative, the idea of modern-racism tends to be less overtly undesirable. This phenomenon is known as benevolent racism. While negative racism is still prevalent, our research focused on identifying the presence and extent of benevolent racism. We hypothesized that benevolent racism would be present, and that involvement in diversity organizations would negatively correlate with benevolent racism and negative racism. Our sample of 93 students read descriptions of two targets (one female, one male) and then rated the likelihood of various behaviors, some of which reflected benevolent racism. Target race (Black or White) was a between-subject variable. Participants then completed the Multidimensional Racism Scale (Neville et al, 2000), and listed their involvement in campus organizations. Though the research suggested a shift towards positive traits in stereotyping and negative correlation between diversity clubs and racism, there were no significant effects found to support our hypothesis.

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Apr 24th, 12:00 PM Apr 24th, 1:00 PM

Presence of Benevolent Racism in College Students and Effects of Extracurricular Involvement

Unlike traditional-racism, where the stereotypes are entirely negative, the idea of modern-racism tends to be less overtly undesirable. This phenomenon is known as benevolent racism. While negative racism is still prevalent, our research focused on identifying the presence and extent of benevolent racism. We hypothesized that benevolent racism would be present, and that involvement in diversity organizations would negatively correlate with benevolent racism and negative racism. Our sample of 93 students read descriptions of two targets (one female, one male) and then rated the likelihood of various behaviors, some of which reflected benevolent racism. Target race (Black or White) was a between-subject variable. Participants then completed the Multidimensional Racism Scale (Neville et al, 2000), and listed their involvement in campus organizations. Though the research suggested a shift towards positive traits in stereotyping and negative correlation between diversity clubs and racism, there were no significant effects found to support our hypothesis.