Event Title

Consequences of EAB induced Ash mortality on liana abundance and litter-fall

Presenter Information

Sarah Oreskovich

Faculty Advisor

Dr. David Matlaga

Start Date

24-4-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2018 5:00 PM

Description

Recently across the U.S. invasive tree killing insects, such as the woody adelgid, emerald ash borer, and other bark beetles, have become common and have the potential to greatly impact forest health. This study focuses on the emerald ash borer and its effects on ash tree populations in Pennsylvania. A leaf litter collection and a liana census were done to evaluate the differences between ash and non-ash trees in relation to the effects of the emerald ash borer. There was no significant difference found in the amount of leaf litter under the ash versus non-ash trees. There was no significant difference in the relation to the amount, size, and type of lianas growing on the ash and non-ash trees. The emerald ash borer invasions and destruction at high levels can cause even more damage to forests than what this study has been able to show.

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Apr 24th, 4:00 PM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

Consequences of EAB induced Ash mortality on liana abundance and litter-fall

Recently across the U.S. invasive tree killing insects, such as the woody adelgid, emerald ash borer, and other bark beetles, have become common and have the potential to greatly impact forest health. This study focuses on the emerald ash borer and its effects on ash tree populations in Pennsylvania. A leaf litter collection and a liana census were done to evaluate the differences between ash and non-ash trees in relation to the effects of the emerald ash borer. There was no significant difference found in the amount of leaf litter under the ash versus non-ash trees. There was no significant difference in the relation to the amount, size, and type of lianas growing on the ash and non-ash trees. The emerald ash borer invasions and destruction at high levels can cause even more damage to forests than what this study has been able to show.