Event Title

Photocatalytic Degradation of Common Pharmaceuticals

Presenter Information

Sydney Bard

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Lou Ann Tom

Start Date

24-4-2018 5:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2018 6:00 PM

Description

To find an inexpensive and time-efficient method to degrade the active ingredient of unused prescription drugs for disposal, photocatalytic degradation is being investigated. Famotidine, a water soluble drug used to treat gastric ulcers and esophagus problems and warfarin, a non water soluble drug used to treat blood clots were tested for efficiency of degradation using ultraviolet (UV) light. Samples were added to water and placed in a UV reactor at 254 nm, and concentration of famotidine and warfarin determined by HPLC after various periods of time. Famotidine concentration decreased over time from 100 ppm to below the limit of detection in 9 hours. Warfarin concentration decreased from 100 ppm to below the limit of detection in 8 days. Control samples kept in the dark were also analyzed over the same time periods and did not show a decrease in concentration over the same time period. Pill forms of the drug were also tested using the same procedure. Treated samples are also being evaluated on Microtox M500, an in vitro testing system which uses bioluminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) to detect toxic substances in different substrates such as water, air, soils and sediments. Other pharmaceuticals, including non water-soluble drugs, are currently being evaluated using the same procedures to determine if degradation can reach a non-detected concentration in a reasonable time with a corresponding decrease in toxicity.

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Apr 24th, 5:00 PM Apr 24th, 6:00 PM

Photocatalytic Degradation of Common Pharmaceuticals

To find an inexpensive and time-efficient method to degrade the active ingredient of unused prescription drugs for disposal, photocatalytic degradation is being investigated. Famotidine, a water soluble drug used to treat gastric ulcers and esophagus problems and warfarin, a non water soluble drug used to treat blood clots were tested for efficiency of degradation using ultraviolet (UV) light. Samples were added to water and placed in a UV reactor at 254 nm, and concentration of famotidine and warfarin determined by HPLC after various periods of time. Famotidine concentration decreased over time from 100 ppm to below the limit of detection in 9 hours. Warfarin concentration decreased from 100 ppm to below the limit of detection in 8 days. Control samples kept in the dark were also analyzed over the same time periods and did not show a decrease in concentration over the same time period. Pill forms of the drug were also tested using the same procedure. Treated samples are also being evaluated on Microtox M500, an in vitro testing system which uses bioluminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) to detect toxic substances in different substrates such as water, air, soils and sediments. Other pharmaceuticals, including non water-soluble drugs, are currently being evaluated using the same procedures to determine if degradation can reach a non-detected concentration in a reasonable time with a corresponding decrease in toxicity.