Event Title

Predator Kill Zones: Wolf spiders chemically detect where a predator has killed a conspecific and respond adaptively

Presenter Information

Eric Pressler
Darren Wright

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Matthew Persons

Start Date

24-4-2018 5:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2018 6:00 PM

Description

The wolf spider Pardosa milvina exhibits adaptive antipredator responses in the presence of silk and excreta from a larger co-occurring predatory wolf spider, Tigrosa helluo. Since wolf spiders deposit silk as they move through the environment, the quantity and quality of silk deposition may change in areas where wolf spiders capture and consume prey. These “kill zones” may provide information about increased predation risk to prey and induce corresponding increased antipredator behavior that, in turn, enhances prey survival. We measured silk patterns produced by the predator, Tigrosa, as well as the prey, Pardosa. We also measured predator attack behavior, Pardosa activity level, and survival on each of these substrates. Our findings suggest that Pardosa can identify areas of predation (i.e. kill zones) using only information in silk and excreta and that this information translates into increased survival and reduced predation attempts in the presence of a live predator.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 24th, 5:00 PM Apr 24th, 6:00 PM

Predator Kill Zones: Wolf spiders chemically detect where a predator has killed a conspecific and respond adaptively

The wolf spider Pardosa milvina exhibits adaptive antipredator responses in the presence of silk and excreta from a larger co-occurring predatory wolf spider, Tigrosa helluo. Since wolf spiders deposit silk as they move through the environment, the quantity and quality of silk deposition may change in areas where wolf spiders capture and consume prey. These “kill zones” may provide information about increased predation risk to prey and induce corresponding increased antipredator behavior that, in turn, enhances prey survival. We measured silk patterns produced by the predator, Tigrosa, as well as the prey, Pardosa. We also measured predator attack behavior, Pardosa activity level, and survival on each of these substrates. Our findings suggest that Pardosa can identify areas of predation (i.e. kill zones) using only information in silk and excreta and that this information translates into increased survival and reduced predation attempts in the presence of a live predator.