Event Title

Impact of Parenting Styles and Future Care-giving Decisions

Presenter Information

Annamaria Rudderow

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Helen Kiso

Start Date

24-4-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2018 5:00 PM

Description

The intention of this study was to examine participants’ scores on the Parental Authority Questionnaire (PAQ) (Buri, 1991) and ascertain the likelihood that they will provide care for their aging parents in the future. Limited studies have investigated this adult-child/aging-parent dyad, making this study a novel contribution to understanding role reversal. Ninety-six participants (Mage = 19.47, SD = 1.18) completed an online questionnaire, consisting of the PAQ and single-item predictors for future care-giving intentions. A hierarchical multiple regression was conducted, which accounted for 24% of the variance. The likelihood of caring for aging parents in the future yielded significance for authoritative parents F(6, 80) = 4.10, p < .01, R2 = .24. This explore the relationship between parenting styles and future care-giving, which delves into the impact that upbringing has on religious preferences. This shines an interesting perspective on factors that impact the likelihood that aging parents will be taken care of by their adult-children in the future.

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Apr 24th, 4:00 PM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

Impact of Parenting Styles and Future Care-giving Decisions

The intention of this study was to examine participants’ scores on the Parental Authority Questionnaire (PAQ) (Buri, 1991) and ascertain the likelihood that they will provide care for their aging parents in the future. Limited studies have investigated this adult-child/aging-parent dyad, making this study a novel contribution to understanding role reversal. Ninety-six participants (Mage = 19.47, SD = 1.18) completed an online questionnaire, consisting of the PAQ and single-item predictors for future care-giving intentions. A hierarchical multiple regression was conducted, which accounted for 24% of the variance. The likelihood of caring for aging parents in the future yielded significance for authoritative parents F(6, 80) = 4.10, p < .01, R2 = .24. This explore the relationship between parenting styles and future care-giving, which delves into the impact that upbringing has on religious preferences. This shines an interesting perspective on factors that impact the likelihood that aging parents will be taken care of by their adult-children in the future.