Event Title

The Impact of Exercise on Risk-Taking Behavior and Object Recognition in Rats

Presenter Information

Alex Blankinship
Sophia Francisco

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Kathleen Bailey

Start Date

24-4-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2018 5:00 PM

Description

Exercise has been associated with improved performance in cognitive tasks, specifically object recognition memory, and changes in risk-taking behavior. The impact of exercise on risk-taking behavior and object recognition in adult Long-Evans male rats were examined in a four-week and six-week wheel running experiment. The four-week wheel running study was comprised of 15 rats: 7 experimental exercise rats—who exercised for an hour every day for a total of four weeks (one hour per day, seven days a week) and 8 control non-exercise rats—who spent their time in their cages. The six-week wheel running study had a similar structure as the previous study, however it was comprised of 12 rats: 6 rats in each group. After four weeks and six weeks of wheel running, the rats were subjected to a battery of tests, including the elevated plus maze and the novel object recognition task (consisting of the habituation phase, familiarization phase, and the testing phase), respectively. We expect to see an enhancement in object recognition memory in the exercise rats in relation to the non-exercise rats. We also expect to see reduced risk-taking behavior in the exercise rats compared to the non-exercise rats.

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Apr 24th, 4:00 PM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

The Impact of Exercise on Risk-Taking Behavior and Object Recognition in Rats

Exercise has been associated with improved performance in cognitive tasks, specifically object recognition memory, and changes in risk-taking behavior. The impact of exercise on risk-taking behavior and object recognition in adult Long-Evans male rats were examined in a four-week and six-week wheel running experiment. The four-week wheel running study was comprised of 15 rats: 7 experimental exercise rats—who exercised for an hour every day for a total of four weeks (one hour per day, seven days a week) and 8 control non-exercise rats—who spent their time in their cages. The six-week wheel running study had a similar structure as the previous study, however it was comprised of 12 rats: 6 rats in each group. After four weeks and six weeks of wheel running, the rats were subjected to a battery of tests, including the elevated plus maze and the novel object recognition task (consisting of the habituation phase, familiarization phase, and the testing phase), respectively. We expect to see an enhancement in object recognition memory in the exercise rats in relation to the non-exercise rats. We also expect to see reduced risk-taking behavior in the exercise rats compared to the non-exercise rats.