Event Title

The Economic Impact of Women: The Effects of Female Labor Participation on Economic Growth in Europe, 1986-2016

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Katarina Keller

Start Date

23-4-2019 2:20 PM

End Date

23-4-2019 2:40 PM

Description

The aim of this study is to assess the correlation between females in the labor force and the GDP per capita growth rate in the following 16 European states: United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark, Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, and Spain. A panel regression was conducted using GDP per capita growth rate as the dependent variable and the national percentage of female labor force rate, female labor force rate with an advanced education, the percentage of females employed in services, the fertility rate, the GDP per capita in US dollars (lagged by one year), inflation, trade, and gross capital formation as independent variables. It can be concluded with statistical significance that females in the labor force impact economic growth. The results convey how an increase in the female labor force rate with an advanced education could stimulate economic growth.

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Apr 23rd, 2:20 PM Apr 23rd, 2:40 PM

The Economic Impact of Women: The Effects of Female Labor Participation on Economic Growth in Europe, 1986-2016

The aim of this study is to assess the correlation between females in the labor force and the GDP per capita growth rate in the following 16 European states: United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark, Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, and Spain. A panel regression was conducted using GDP per capita growth rate as the dependent variable and the national percentage of female labor force rate, female labor force rate with an advanced education, the percentage of females employed in services, the fertility rate, the GDP per capita in US dollars (lagged by one year), inflation, trade, and gross capital formation as independent variables. It can be concluded with statistical significance that females in the labor force impact economic growth. The results convey how an increase in the female labor force rate with an advanced education could stimulate economic growth.