Event Title

Prevalence of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Relation to Soil Temperature in Centralia, Pennsylvania

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Tammy Tobin

Start Date

23-4-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

23-4-2019 5:00 PM

Description

Extreme environmental conditions, especially elevated temperatures, have been thought to have an influence on the presence of antibiotic resistance genes in soil environments. The Pennsylvanian town of Centralia, located in Columbia county, was once the location for a lucrative coal mining business that has been abandoned due to the fire that continues to burn in the underground coal mines. The primary focus of this research is to determine how soil bacterial competition has been affected by the increase in soil temperature caused by this fire, specifically by determining how antibiotic producing and antibiotic resistance gene prevalence and expression have been impacted by the fire’s progress. We have used shotgun metagenomic data from 2014 Centralia soil samples to establish that the abundances of two multi-drug transport system genes (COG0842 and COG1132), a beta-lactamase superfamily II gene (COG2333), and a Na+/H+ antiporter or related arsenate permease gene (COG1055) are each correlated to soil temperature. We have developed PCR primers for these 4 genes and will use real time PCR to analyze their expression in 2018 soil samples. Ultimately, these analyses will shed insight into how bacterial competition is impacted by increasing soil temperatures, which may have relevance as soil temperatures increase globally.

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Apr 23rd, 4:00 PM Apr 23rd, 5:00 PM

Prevalence of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Relation to Soil Temperature in Centralia, Pennsylvania

Extreme environmental conditions, especially elevated temperatures, have been thought to have an influence on the presence of antibiotic resistance genes in soil environments. The Pennsylvanian town of Centralia, located in Columbia county, was once the location for a lucrative coal mining business that has been abandoned due to the fire that continues to burn in the underground coal mines. The primary focus of this research is to determine how soil bacterial competition has been affected by the increase in soil temperature caused by this fire, specifically by determining how antibiotic producing and antibiotic resistance gene prevalence and expression have been impacted by the fire’s progress. We have used shotgun metagenomic data from 2014 Centralia soil samples to establish that the abundances of two multi-drug transport system genes (COG0842 and COG1132), a beta-lactamase superfamily II gene (COG2333), and a Na+/H+ antiporter or related arsenate permease gene (COG1055) are each correlated to soil temperature. We have developed PCR primers for these 4 genes and will use real time PCR to analyze their expression in 2018 soil samples. Ultimately, these analyses will shed insight into how bacterial competition is impacted by increasing soil temperatures, which may have relevance as soil temperatures increase globally.