Event Title

Paleoecological Analysis of Shell Hash Beds from the Trimmers Rock Formation (Upper Devonian- Frasnian) along Route 11-15

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Jennifer Elick

Start Date

23-4-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

23-4-2019 2:00 PM

Description

Shell beds from the Trimmers Rock Formation (Upper Devonian) along Rt 11-15 were compared to determine the controls acting on deposition of a prograding ramp. These shell beds are comprised of fossils that may have been strongly influenced by periodic high energy storm events, hypopycnal flows, and turbidity currents. The shell beds may have been deposited by the same regional events, and similar beds from nearby that were used to compare are laterally discontinuous and non-correlative. Along Rt 11-15, the rock is greenish gray, shale with laterally discontinuous thin beds of shaley sandstone that contain ripples, laminae, and shell beds. This succession is overlain by reddish-gray sandstone dominated by ball and pillow structures. This study focused on samples collected north of Liverpool, PA; the number of organisms were counted per unit cm2. Thin sections contain bryozoans, brachiopods, and crinoids with less abundant tentaculites, carbonized plant material, and fish bone.

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Apr 23rd, 1:00 PM Apr 23rd, 2:00 PM

Paleoecological Analysis of Shell Hash Beds from the Trimmers Rock Formation (Upper Devonian- Frasnian) along Route 11-15

Shell beds from the Trimmers Rock Formation (Upper Devonian) along Rt 11-15 were compared to determine the controls acting on deposition of a prograding ramp. These shell beds are comprised of fossils that may have been strongly influenced by periodic high energy storm events, hypopycnal flows, and turbidity currents. The shell beds may have been deposited by the same regional events, and similar beds from nearby that were used to compare are laterally discontinuous and non-correlative. Along Rt 11-15, the rock is greenish gray, shale with laterally discontinuous thin beds of shaley sandstone that contain ripples, laminae, and shell beds. This succession is overlain by reddish-gray sandstone dominated by ball and pillow structures. This study focused on samples collected north of Liverpool, PA; the number of organisms were counted per unit cm2. Thin sections contain bryozoans, brachiopods, and crinoids with less abundant tentaculites, carbonized plant material, and fish bone.