Event Title

Effects of Intrauterine Global Restriction on Reward Processing of Offspring

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Erin Rhinehart

Start Date

23-4-2019 12:00 PM

End Date

23-4-2019 1:00 PM

Description

Obesity in recent years has become the leading cause of death and is associated with over 60 high risk diseases. Evidence indicates that the in utero environment significantly impacts fetal development via the process of gestational programming. In particular, maternal nutrition appears to play a significant part in the development of offspring addictive tendencies. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate limiting enzyme for the production of the reward neurotransmitter, dopamine, acts in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to reinforce rewarding behaviors. In this study, we used global caloric maternal restriction during gestation to produce intrauterine growth restricted (IGUR) offspring in rats, to understand how expression of TH expression is affected in the reward pathway of IUGR offspring. We hypothesize that alterations in VTA TH expression will explain observed increases in binge-like consumption of rewarding substances, such as sucrose observed in IUGR offspring.

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Apr 23rd, 12:00 PM Apr 23rd, 1:00 PM

Effects of Intrauterine Global Restriction on Reward Processing of Offspring

Obesity in recent years has become the leading cause of death and is associated with over 60 high risk diseases. Evidence indicates that the in utero environment significantly impacts fetal development via the process of gestational programming. In particular, maternal nutrition appears to play a significant part in the development of offspring addictive tendencies. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate limiting enzyme for the production of the reward neurotransmitter, dopamine, acts in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to reinforce rewarding behaviors. In this study, we used global caloric maternal restriction during gestation to produce intrauterine growth restricted (IGUR) offspring in rats, to understand how expression of TH expression is affected in the reward pathway of IUGR offspring. We hypothesize that alterations in VTA TH expression will explain observed increases in binge-like consumption of rewarding substances, such as sucrose observed in IUGR offspring.