Event Title

Coyote (Canis latrans) diet in relation to high population centers in Pennsylvania

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Carols Iudica

Start Date

23-4-2019 12:00 PM

End Date

23-4-2019 1:00 PM

Description

Coyotes are known to incorporate domestic animals least partially in their diet. This dietary pattern has led to constant conflict with humans. The goal of this study is to better understand the coyote’s dietary patterns which may lead to a decrease in interspecies conflict. The expectation being counties with high population centers will have a higher percent of small and domestic animals in their diet. Areas with a city, borough, college, etc. which possessed a population of >50% the average county population in Pennsylvania were considered high populated centers. Stomachs were collected across 10 counties from 2009-2012. Contents used for identification were primarily bone fragments and hair. Contents were identified using ad hoc reference collections. Identified species comprised largely of white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus, and voles, Microtus spp. Given the small sample size statistical tests were not possible, however, results suggest a higher percent of small animals in areas with high population centers. More research is needed.

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Apr 23rd, 12:00 PM Apr 23rd, 1:00 PM

Coyote (Canis latrans) diet in relation to high population centers in Pennsylvania

Coyotes are known to incorporate domestic animals least partially in their diet. This dietary pattern has led to constant conflict with humans. The goal of this study is to better understand the coyote’s dietary patterns which may lead to a decrease in interspecies conflict. The expectation being counties with high population centers will have a higher percent of small and domestic animals in their diet. Areas with a city, borough, college, etc. which possessed a population of >50% the average county population in Pennsylvania were considered high populated centers. Stomachs were collected across 10 counties from 2009-2012. Contents used for identification were primarily bone fragments and hair. Contents were identified using ad hoc reference collections. Identified species comprised largely of white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus, and voles, Microtus spp. Given the small sample size statistical tests were not possible, however, results suggest a higher percent of small animals in areas with high population centers. More research is needed.