Event Title

Comparing baseline sedimentation rates in paired perennial streams under different land uses during high precipitation events

Presenter Information

Shane Moyer, Susquehanna University

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Daniel Ressler

Start Date

23-4-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

23-4-2019 5:00 PM

Description

Sediment and nutrient delivery are primary impairments of the Chesapeake Bay. These threats are produced in the agricultural landscapes in the Susquehanna River watershed. Best management practices (BMP’s) such as riparian buffers and livestock exclusions are used in stream restoration projects. This study presents the sediment transportation characteristics of paired micro-watersheds in unnamed tributaries to Elk Creek in Centre County, Pennsylvania before stream restoration. Water samples were collected every six hours by autosamplers at upstream and downstream locations on a barnyard where restoration will begin next year, and a forested reference site. Samples were analyzed for field parameters, turbidity, and sediment content using hydrometers to estimate suspended sediments according to their size. During heavy rain, the two watersheds often had similar turbidity, but the agricultural stream carried far more fine particles than the forested site. This study will be repeated after stream restoration to determine the effectiveness of the BMP’s.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 23rd, 4:00 PM Apr 23rd, 5:00 PM

Comparing baseline sedimentation rates in paired perennial streams under different land uses during high precipitation events

Sediment and nutrient delivery are primary impairments of the Chesapeake Bay. These threats are produced in the agricultural landscapes in the Susquehanna River watershed. Best management practices (BMP’s) such as riparian buffers and livestock exclusions are used in stream restoration projects. This study presents the sediment transportation characteristics of paired micro-watersheds in unnamed tributaries to Elk Creek in Centre County, Pennsylvania before stream restoration. Water samples were collected every six hours by autosamplers at upstream and downstream locations on a barnyard where restoration will begin next year, and a forested reference site. Samples were analyzed for field parameters, turbidity, and sediment content using hydrometers to estimate suspended sediments according to their size. During heavy rain, the two watersheds often had similar turbidity, but the agricultural stream carried far more fine particles than the forested site. This study will be repeated after stream restoration to determine the effectiveness of the BMP’s.