Event Title

Graffiti Yarn: Politics, Art, and Contemporary Culture

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Christine Swisher

Start Date

23-4-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

23-4-2019 5:00 PM

Description

As demonstrated by scholars like Linda Nochlin and Griselda Pollock, women have typically been excluded from the art history canon. Although female artists have been able to gain more recognition in recent years, many women are exploring alternate paths into the art world. Specifically, yarn bombing serves as a community-driven art form that is easily accessible to women, circumventing the still male-dominated arena of museum art. Finalized products usually speak to political or gender issues because the platform gives women the ability to manipulate public space to generate social change. Knitting and crocheting are typically considered to be feminine and a form of “low” art. Seemingly embracing the stereotype, women working as yarn bombers are reclaiming the notion that knitting is inherently feminine and unlike the art shown in museums. “Graffiti Yarn: Politics, Art, and Contemporary Culture” not only explores the contributions female yarn artists have made to the relatively new movement of “craftivism,” but touches on the work of male knitters, such as Mike Kelley, whose knit blankets and dolls have garnered mainstream success, finding exhibition space in major art museums, unlike his female counterparts. There is still a disparity between male and female artists, even when it comes to traditionally feminine mediums, such as knitting and crocheting. Overall, “Graffiti Yarn” examines how yarn and politics intersect in the story of feminist art.

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Apr 23rd, 4:00 PM Apr 23rd, 5:00 PM

Graffiti Yarn: Politics, Art, and Contemporary Culture

As demonstrated by scholars like Linda Nochlin and Griselda Pollock, women have typically been excluded from the art history canon. Although female artists have been able to gain more recognition in recent years, many women are exploring alternate paths into the art world. Specifically, yarn bombing serves as a community-driven art form that is easily accessible to women, circumventing the still male-dominated arena of museum art. Finalized products usually speak to political or gender issues because the platform gives women the ability to manipulate public space to generate social change. Knitting and crocheting are typically considered to be feminine and a form of “low” art. Seemingly embracing the stereotype, women working as yarn bombers are reclaiming the notion that knitting is inherently feminine and unlike the art shown in museums. “Graffiti Yarn: Politics, Art, and Contemporary Culture” not only explores the contributions female yarn artists have made to the relatively new movement of “craftivism,” but touches on the work of male knitters, such as Mike Kelley, whose knit blankets and dolls have garnered mainstream success, finding exhibition space in major art museums, unlike his female counterparts. There is still a disparity between male and female artists, even when it comes to traditionally feminine mediums, such as knitting and crocheting. Overall, “Graffiti Yarn” examines how yarn and politics intersect in the story of feminist art.