Presenter Information

Joseph RadelFollow

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Daniel Ressler

Start Date

April 2020

End Date

April 2020

Description

A large concern in today’s watersheds are the impairments on sediment and nutrient in the Chesapeake Bay. Many threats come from agricultural landscapes that run along large streams, creeks, and rivers. Using best management practices such as riparian buffers and exclusion of livestock are major factors that help in stream restoration. This research will show sediment loss, along with other features like ammonia and nitrate in small watersheds along Elk Creek in Centre County, Pennsylvania. Water samples were taken every six hours by autosamplers from the barnyard upstream and downstream locations, and at the forest upstream and downstream site. Data was analyzed from the samples for field parameters and turbidity. Agricultural stream had higher valves for pH, specific conductivity, and turbidity. Forest stream had a higher valve for dissolved oxygen. Weekly average of ammonia was 2 times higher in the agricultural stream, along with nitrate 15 times compared to the forest stream. Due to weather condensations, the forest saw very little to almost no soil loss in the fall compared to the agricultural stream always losing soil every day, averaging 18,000 kg of sediment lost a week. This study is will help determine the affects of a stream restoration, that is placed to happen in the summer of 2020.

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Apr 28th, 12:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 AM

Sedimentation Rates in Paired Streams During High Precipitation Events on Elk Creek

A large concern in today’s watersheds are the impairments on sediment and nutrient in the Chesapeake Bay. Many threats come from agricultural landscapes that run along large streams, creeks, and rivers. Using best management practices such as riparian buffers and exclusion of livestock are major factors that help in stream restoration. This research will show sediment loss, along with other features like ammonia and nitrate in small watersheds along Elk Creek in Centre County, Pennsylvania. Water samples were taken every six hours by autosamplers from the barnyard upstream and downstream locations, and at the forest upstream and downstream site. Data was analyzed from the samples for field parameters and turbidity. Agricultural stream had higher valves for pH, specific conductivity, and turbidity. Forest stream had a higher valve for dissolved oxygen. Weekly average of ammonia was 2 times higher in the agricultural stream, along with nitrate 15 times compared to the forest stream. Due to weather condensations, the forest saw very little to almost no soil loss in the fall compared to the agricultural stream always losing soil every day, averaging 18,000 kg of sediment lost a week. This study is will help determine the affects of a stream restoration, that is placed to happen in the summer of 2020.

 

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