Presenter Information

Caitlin KellyFollow

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Thomas A. Martin

Start Date

28-4-2020 12:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2020 12:00 AM

Description

This study investigated the relationships between emotional intelligence, coping strategies, and attachment style in college students. Measures used included the Emotional Intelligence Scale, The COPE Inventory, and the Revised Adult Attachment Scale – Close Relationship Version. There were three hypotheses: (a) that there will be positive correlations between emotional intelligence and positive coping strategies, (b) that emotional intelligence will be negatively correlated with negative coping strategies, and (c) that that there will be a positive correlation between secure or close attachment style, level of emotional intelligence, and positive coping strategies. Results supported the hypotheses, yielding significant positive correlations between emotional intelligence and positive coping strategies, negative correlations of emotional intelligence with negative coping strategies, and positive correlations of secure attachment style with level of emotional intelligence and positive coping strategies. One potential implication of these findings is that interventions intended to develop emotional intelligence may promote healthier and more positive coping strategies as well. Given that the present study is correlational, this causal link must be established with further research.

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Apr 28th, 12:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 AM

Emotional Intelligence, Coping Strategies, and Attachment Style in College Students

This study investigated the relationships between emotional intelligence, coping strategies, and attachment style in college students. Measures used included the Emotional Intelligence Scale, The COPE Inventory, and the Revised Adult Attachment Scale – Close Relationship Version. There were three hypotheses: (a) that there will be positive correlations between emotional intelligence and positive coping strategies, (b) that emotional intelligence will be negatively correlated with negative coping strategies, and (c) that that there will be a positive correlation between secure or close attachment style, level of emotional intelligence, and positive coping strategies. Results supported the hypotheses, yielding significant positive correlations between emotional intelligence and positive coping strategies, negative correlations of emotional intelligence with negative coping strategies, and positive correlations of secure attachment style with level of emotional intelligence and positive coping strategies. One potential implication of these findings is that interventions intended to develop emotional intelligence may promote healthier and more positive coping strategies as well. Given that the present study is correlational, this causal link must be established with further research.

 

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