Presenter Information

Sana AhmedFollow

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Samya Bano Zain, Mr. Robert Everly

Start Date

April 2020

End Date

April 2020

Description

The goal of our project was to map the standing wave patterns in a microwave oven cavity using experimentation. The next task was then to view the standing wave patterns utilizing computer simulations. In a related project done by one of the group members, a microwave oven was used to find the speed of light. He placed chocolate into the microwave cavity, let the chocolate melt at the antinodes of the standing waves. He then measured the distance between the melted spots, multiplied the distance by the frequency of the microwave and found the speed of light. However, while finding the speed of light, we became curious about the patterns of the standing waves in the oven, as they seem to change based on objects placed inside the cavity. The experiment was retried using various materials, including cheese, neon bulbs, thermal paper, etc, always taking care to repeat the experimental setup identically. Finally, we used plexiglass sheets and a thermal camera to see the intensities of the antinodes of the standing waves. The thermal images gathered from experiments became the basis of our computer simulations. We created a program to extract a three-dimensional representation of the thermal images. The 3D surfaces were then superimposed over each other as the plexiglass sheets were in the cavity. We are now able to map the standing wave patterns in the microwave oven cavity as a function of heat intensity.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 28th, 12:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 AM

Mapping and Simulating Standing Wave Patterns in a Microwave Oven

The goal of our project was to map the standing wave patterns in a microwave oven cavity using experimentation. The next task was then to view the standing wave patterns utilizing computer simulations. In a related project done by one of the group members, a microwave oven was used to find the speed of light. He placed chocolate into the microwave cavity, let the chocolate melt at the antinodes of the standing waves. He then measured the distance between the melted spots, multiplied the distance by the frequency of the microwave and found the speed of light. However, while finding the speed of light, we became curious about the patterns of the standing waves in the oven, as they seem to change based on objects placed inside the cavity. The experiment was retried using various materials, including cheese, neon bulbs, thermal paper, etc, always taking care to repeat the experimental setup identically. Finally, we used plexiglass sheets and a thermal camera to see the intensities of the antinodes of the standing waves. The thermal images gathered from experiments became the basis of our computer simulations. We created a program to extract a three-dimensional representation of the thermal images. The 3D surfaces were then superimposed over each other as the plexiglass sheets were in the cavity. We are now able to map the standing wave patterns in the microwave oven cavity as a function of heat intensity.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.