Faculty Advisor

Dr. Daniel Ressler

Start Date

April 2020

End Date

April 2020

Description

Best Management Practices (BMPs) are often used to describe acceptable practices that could be implemented to protect water quality and promote soil conservation at any particular location. Toe logs, cross vanes, and riparian plantings are just a few of the many possible BMPs used in stream restoration projects to anchor bank sediments, control the direction of water flow, re-establish riffles and pools, and improve the overall aquatic habitat. Eighteen impaired sites with implemented BMPs and four forested (reference) sites across four Pennsylvania counties were electro-shocked for fish populations. The difference in fish populations before and after the installation of BMPs at all eighteen impaired sites were compared and served as one of the many possible ways to assess the effectiveness of the implemented BMPs. It was expected that the streams with a greater quantity of BMPs installed would result in healthier, more abundant, fish populations. The goal of this research is to gain an understanding of which BMPs are most effective in improving fish habitat and then use this information to create a ranking of BMPs or BMP categories in order to guide restoration managers toward the most effective techniques for the site-specific conditions.

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Apr 28th, 12:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 AM

Evaluation of Best Management Practices for Stream Retoration Projects

Best Management Practices (BMPs) are often used to describe acceptable practices that could be implemented to protect water quality and promote soil conservation at any particular location. Toe logs, cross vanes, and riparian plantings are just a few of the many possible BMPs used in stream restoration projects to anchor bank sediments, control the direction of water flow, re-establish riffles and pools, and improve the overall aquatic habitat. Eighteen impaired sites with implemented BMPs and four forested (reference) sites across four Pennsylvania counties were electro-shocked for fish populations. The difference in fish populations before and after the installation of BMPs at all eighteen impaired sites were compared and served as one of the many possible ways to assess the effectiveness of the implemented BMPs. It was expected that the streams with a greater quantity of BMPs installed would result in healthier, more abundant, fish populations. The goal of this research is to gain an understanding of which BMPs are most effective in improving fish habitat and then use this information to create a ranking of BMPs or BMP categories in order to guide restoration managers toward the most effective techniques for the site-specific conditions.

 

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