Presenter Information

Rudi RandallFollow

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Derek Straub

Start Date

28-4-2020 12:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2020 12:00 AM

Description

Air pollutants, such as nitrate, sulfate, and ammonia, can negatively affect the environment and human health. Pollutants can be removed from the atmosphere through dry deposition, in which dry particles and gases contact the ground directly, or wet deposition, in which particles and gases interact with precipitation before reaching the ground. Despite there being two ways particles and gases can be removed from the atmosphere, wet deposition has been studied more routinely and comprehensively than dry deposition. In this research, dry deposition to surfaces covered by dew or frost was examined for its chemical makeup (including cations, anions, and organic acids) and compared to wet deposition using data from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP). In addition, source regions of the chemical species were assessed through HYSPLIT back trajectory modeling. Over five weeks from October to November 2019, 10 dry deposition samples were collected and analyzed at a rural college campus in Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania. Each sample was collected over an 11 hour period between dusk and dawn on a 0.84 m2 insulated PTFE surface. Ion chromatography shows ammonium exhibited a higher concentration than any other ions in the study, six times more concentrated than nitrate. Generally, airmasses that impacted the study site during sample collection originated from Canada or other regions to the northwest. These findings and others will provide insight into the role of dry deposition in the removal of pollutants.

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Apr 28th, 12:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 AM

Chemical Composition and Source Regions of Dry Deposition

Air pollutants, such as nitrate, sulfate, and ammonia, can negatively affect the environment and human health. Pollutants can be removed from the atmosphere through dry deposition, in which dry particles and gases contact the ground directly, or wet deposition, in which particles and gases interact with precipitation before reaching the ground. Despite there being two ways particles and gases can be removed from the atmosphere, wet deposition has been studied more routinely and comprehensively than dry deposition. In this research, dry deposition to surfaces covered by dew or frost was examined for its chemical makeup (including cations, anions, and organic acids) and compared to wet deposition using data from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP). In addition, source regions of the chemical species were assessed through HYSPLIT back trajectory modeling. Over five weeks from October to November 2019, 10 dry deposition samples were collected and analyzed at a rural college campus in Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania. Each sample was collected over an 11 hour period between dusk and dawn on a 0.84 m2 insulated PTFE surface. Ion chromatography shows ammonium exhibited a higher concentration than any other ions in the study, six times more concentrated than nitrate. Generally, airmasses that impacted the study site during sample collection originated from Canada or other regions to the northwest. These findings and others will provide insight into the role of dry deposition in the removal of pollutants.

 

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