Event Title

The Effects of Hemispherical Asymmetry on Substance-Dependent Individuals

Presenter Information

Colin HokeFollow

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Wade Johnson

Start Date

28-4-2020 12:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2020 12:00 AM

Description

The ENIGMA Addiction Consortium leverages the ENIGMA Project protocols for multi-site meta- and mega-analyses to explore genetic associations with neuroimaging phenotypes related to mental health. Hundreds of sites around the world have prepared their imaging data according to the standardized ENIGMA protocols. ENIGMA Addiction is interested in brain phenotypes affected in individuals addicted to substances, including: alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, etc. Previous research was conducted by this working group to assess the relationship of drug use on subcortical volume and cortical thickness (Mackey et al., 2019). Laterality, including hemispherical asymmetry in the brain, is also of interest in this sample. Brain asymmetry can be linked to cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders (Kong et al., 2018). Data from previous studies were used to see if brain asymmetry is associated with substance use.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 28th, 12:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 AM

The Effects of Hemispherical Asymmetry on Substance-Dependent Individuals

The ENIGMA Addiction Consortium leverages the ENIGMA Project protocols for multi-site meta- and mega-analyses to explore genetic associations with neuroimaging phenotypes related to mental health. Hundreds of sites around the world have prepared their imaging data according to the standardized ENIGMA protocols. ENIGMA Addiction is interested in brain phenotypes affected in individuals addicted to substances, including: alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, etc. Previous research was conducted by this working group to assess the relationship of drug use on subcortical volume and cortical thickness (Mackey et al., 2019). Laterality, including hemispherical asymmetry in the brain, is also of interest in this sample. Brain asymmetry can be linked to cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders (Kong et al., 2018). Data from previous studies were used to see if brain asymmetry is associated with substance use.