Presenter Information

Hannah Kelly-QuigleyFollow

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Erin Rhinehart

Start Date

April 2020

End Date

April 2020

Description

Alcohol has sexually dimorphic effects on the brain, and the endogenous opioid, beta-endorphin (BE), mediates many effects of alcohol. In the mesolimbic dopamine reward pathway, alcohol stimulates neurons to enhance dopaminergic signaling, but the exact mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unknown. Alcohol could impact dopaminergic signaling in the reward pathway by affecting the production and localization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine synthesis. Therefore, we hypothesized that acute alcohol intoxication would increase c-fos expression and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity (TH-ir) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) in a sex- and BE-dependent manner. In this study, male and female wild type (WT) and BE knock out (KO) mice were injected intraperitoneally with 2g/kg ethanol (EtOH) or saline. Post-injection animals were sacrificed by overdose with sodium pentobarbital and perfused with saline followed by 4% paraformaldehyde. Brain sections (35μm) were processed for immunohistochemical staining for TH (Anti-TH, 1:10,000, EMD Millipore) and cfos (1:5000, SYnaptic SYstems). The number of single and double labeled cells in the VTA were counted and the integrated optical density of the TH-ir staining in the NAc was quantified using Image Pro Plus software. In the VTA, KO females given EtOH treatment exhibited greater c-fos and TH expression. EtOH treatment significantly decreased TH-ir in the NAc in WT mice and increased it in KO mice. The results of this study indicate that females are particularly sensitive to the effects of EtOH and emphasizes the importance of studying the impact of sex on alcohol addiction.

Comments

Authors that wouldn't have been listed as presenting:

Madison Waldron, Kiarah Leonard, Erin M. Rhinehart, Judy E. Grisel

Share

COinS
 
Apr 28th, 12:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 AM

Beta-endorphin expression and sex affect the ability of alcohol to alter tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the reward pathway in mice

Alcohol has sexually dimorphic effects on the brain, and the endogenous opioid, beta-endorphin (BE), mediates many effects of alcohol. In the mesolimbic dopamine reward pathway, alcohol stimulates neurons to enhance dopaminergic signaling, but the exact mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unknown. Alcohol could impact dopaminergic signaling in the reward pathway by affecting the production and localization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine synthesis. Therefore, we hypothesized that acute alcohol intoxication would increase c-fos expression and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity (TH-ir) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) in a sex- and BE-dependent manner. In this study, male and female wild type (WT) and BE knock out (KO) mice were injected intraperitoneally with 2g/kg ethanol (EtOH) or saline. Post-injection animals were sacrificed by overdose with sodium pentobarbital and perfused with saline followed by 4% paraformaldehyde. Brain sections (35μm) were processed for immunohistochemical staining for TH (Anti-TH, 1:10,000, EMD Millipore) and cfos (1:5000, SYnaptic SYstems). The number of single and double labeled cells in the VTA were counted and the integrated optical density of the TH-ir staining in the NAc was quantified using Image Pro Plus software. In the VTA, KO females given EtOH treatment exhibited greater c-fos and TH expression. EtOH treatment significantly decreased TH-ir in the NAc in WT mice and increased it in KO mice. The results of this study indicate that females are particularly sensitive to the effects of EtOH and emphasizes the importance of studying the impact of sex on alcohol addiction.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.