Faculty Advisor

Dr. Helen Kiso

Start Date

27-4-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

27-4-2021 12:00 AM

Description

In this study, researchers looked at several factors between social media use and different relationships. One study showed that relationships can be torn apart if the members have different opinions on controversial topics (Kruse et al., 2008). The family systems theory suggests that family structure could shape social development and emotional functioning, caused by differences in family–level contexts (Wikle & Hoagland, 2020). Researchers looked to see if high utilization of social media within a relationship will result in lower satisfaction. To test the hypothesis, several Likert scales were put into a survey and distributed online to students from Susquehanna University enrolled in psychology courses. Questions within the scales related to information about student demographics, social media use, and self-efficacy. Students had the option to voluntarily take the survey as well as the option to withdraw at any time, but surveys that were withdrawn were not counted as part of the data. Our results did not support the hypothesis. The statistics from the t-test and the Pearson’s r correlation did not provide the statistical data that we hypothesized, t(143) = 0.21, p = 0.98, r(145) = 0.11, p = 0.201. One limitation was that we had a limited sample of psychology students at a small campus. Future research could include larger and broader sample sizes, along with more age-appropriate relationship scales. Even though the amount of time on social media did not cause less satisfaction, our implications included to use social media with caution as it could lead to potential harm, like self- consciousness or cyber-bullying.

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Apr 27th, 12:00 AM Apr 27th, 12:00 AM

Social Media and Relationship Satisfaction

In this study, researchers looked at several factors between social media use and different relationships. One study showed that relationships can be torn apart if the members have different opinions on controversial topics (Kruse et al., 2008). The family systems theory suggests that family structure could shape social development and emotional functioning, caused by differences in family–level contexts (Wikle & Hoagland, 2020). Researchers looked to see if high utilization of social media within a relationship will result in lower satisfaction. To test the hypothesis, several Likert scales were put into a survey and distributed online to students from Susquehanna University enrolled in psychology courses. Questions within the scales related to information about student demographics, social media use, and self-efficacy. Students had the option to voluntarily take the survey as well as the option to withdraw at any time, but surveys that were withdrawn were not counted as part of the data. Our results did not support the hypothesis. The statistics from the t-test and the Pearson’s r correlation did not provide the statistical data that we hypothesized, t(143) = 0.21, p = 0.98, r(145) = 0.11, p = 0.201. One limitation was that we had a limited sample of psychology students at a small campus. Future research could include larger and broader sample sizes, along with more age-appropriate relationship scales. Even though the amount of time on social media did not cause less satisfaction, our implications included to use social media with caution as it could lead to potential harm, like self- consciousness or cyber-bullying.

 

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