Event Title

Shortlist to Nominee

Presenter Information

Gabrielle MartinFollow

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Nick Clark

Start Date

27-4-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

27-4-2021 12:00 AM

Description

Moving from the shortlist to the nominee on the United States Supreme Court is impacted by many things. It is well established that factors such as Ivy League law school attendance, age, race, gender and presidents viewing nominations as a representation of their policy preferences. This study aims to further analyze how institution of legal education, race and gender impacts the likelihood that someone who is on the shortlist to becoming the actual nominee. In this context, shortlist is referring to a list of selected candidates from which a final choice is made. Actual nominee refers to the candidate that is selected off of the shortlist to be confirmed in front of the Senate. To test the hypotheses that top 3 law school, race, and gender lead to being moved from shortlist to nominee, cases from President Hoover to President Trump were compiled into a Harvard dataset. The results of a logistic regression showed one hypothesis to be true, with the other two not being supported. These results suggest that attending a top three law school, Harvard, Yale or Columbia, is the most important factor in the likelihood of becoming a Supreme Court Justice

Share

COinS
 
Apr 27th, 12:00 AM Apr 27th, 12:00 AM

Shortlist to Nominee

Moving from the shortlist to the nominee on the United States Supreme Court is impacted by many things. It is well established that factors such as Ivy League law school attendance, age, race, gender and presidents viewing nominations as a representation of their policy preferences. This study aims to further analyze how institution of legal education, race and gender impacts the likelihood that someone who is on the shortlist to becoming the actual nominee. In this context, shortlist is referring to a list of selected candidates from which a final choice is made. Actual nominee refers to the candidate that is selected off of the shortlist to be confirmed in front of the Senate. To test the hypotheses that top 3 law school, race, and gender lead to being moved from shortlist to nominee, cases from President Hoover to President Trump were compiled into a Harvard dataset. The results of a logistic regression showed one hypothesis to be true, with the other two not being supported. These results suggest that attending a top three law school, Harvard, Yale or Columbia, is the most important factor in the likelihood of becoming a Supreme Court Justice

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.