Faculty Advisor

Dr. M.L. Klotz

Start Date

27-4-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

27-4-2021 12:00 AM

Description

Previous research has found that people hold stereotypes towards people who stutter, assuming they have lower self-esteem and poorer social adjustment. However, those studies typically explicitly stated that a target has a stutter disorder, which may have produced a priming effect. The current study investigated whether similar stereotypes would be seen if stuttering was implied with a written transcript, and whether empathy might improve participants' ratings of a stuttering target. Participants read an interview transcript manipulating target gender and whether the target stuttered, then rated the target on 9 traits used in previous research. Targets with a stutter were rated lower in self-esteem, decisiveness, and social adjustment, and higher in stress. Contrary to prediction, participants scoring higher on empathy rated stuttering targets less favorably on self-esteem and social adjustment. One limitation of this study is that participants may have assumed that the target lacked speaking skills or was stressed, rather than having a stuttering disorder. Further research is needed to establish whether participants perceive a stuttering speaker as having a speech disorder or attribute stuttering to some other cause. This distinction would be important for people with speech difficulties, since it may affect the way they are perceived by others.

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Apr 27th, 12:00 AM Apr 27th, 12:00 AM

Impact of a Stuttering Disorder on How Individuals Are Perceived and Factors That Affect this Perception

Previous research has found that people hold stereotypes towards people who stutter, assuming they have lower self-esteem and poorer social adjustment. However, those studies typically explicitly stated that a target has a stutter disorder, which may have produced a priming effect. The current study investigated whether similar stereotypes would be seen if stuttering was implied with a written transcript, and whether empathy might improve participants' ratings of a stuttering target. Participants read an interview transcript manipulating target gender and whether the target stuttered, then rated the target on 9 traits used in previous research. Targets with a stutter were rated lower in self-esteem, decisiveness, and social adjustment, and higher in stress. Contrary to prediction, participants scoring higher on empathy rated stuttering targets less favorably on self-esteem and social adjustment. One limitation of this study is that participants may have assumed that the target lacked speaking skills or was stressed, rather than having a stuttering disorder. Further research is needed to establish whether participants perceive a stuttering speaker as having a speech disorder or attribute stuttering to some other cause. This distinction would be important for people with speech difficulties, since it may affect the way they are perceived by others.

 

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